Category Archives: Norton

The New Norton – Family First

Norton Internet Security

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The New Norton – Family First

As a busy family in today’s heavily connected world, comprehensive Internet security may not be the first thing on your list that you have the time to put serious thought and consideration into. Between coordinating schedules, getting the kids off to school and managing the household, it’s easy to see why this very important issue can get overlooked. Who wants to spend what little down time they have researching Internet security?

Households can be pretty hectic day to day: remember that time when the kids spilled juice on Dad’s laptop, resulting in him losing his work presentation? Or when you begrudgingly played, “Frozen” for the 100th time and you accidentally clicked on that link that destroyed your hard drive? Or, who can forget when your toddler gave your brand new tablet a “bath”? All those pictures from the first family vacation- down the drain! Everyone with kids knows that accidents do happen, so what do you do when the inevitable strikes and you lose important data, or you become susceptible to a personal data breach?

Today’s households have an abundance of devices that are being shared with multiple family members. As busy parents, you can’t keep tabs on what the kids are doing at all times (as much as you’d love to have those “eyes in the back of your head” your parents always warned you about). We often hand over our devices to “keep the peace”. But an unsuspecting child can inadvertently make mistakes that can cost you, like downloading a fake app that looked like a new version of a game, which was actually malware in disguise. How worried should you be about viruses on your mobile phones and tablets? As a parent, we’re sure you may also worry about the information your kids are inadvertently giving away online. What about the online creeps and thieves that can see what your kids are posting on Social media?  How do you protect them from being easy targets? You may hear stories in the news about Social Media scams, or data breaches, but it’s hard to keep up with everything, let alone know exactly what to do about it. It would be nice to have something that looks out for these threats for you, something that protects across all of your devices.

Norton Security is just that. The new Norton is growing with today’s families, keeping your information secure, guaranteed, so that you have one less thing to worry about. We back our security solution with our Norton Protection Promise, which offers 100% of your money back if we fail to remove a virus from your PC or Mac. We understand that with a family’s busy lifestyle, things can happen at any time, so we want to be there right when you need us the most. That’s why we offer 24/7 live support.

Norton has engineered many “under the hood” advances. This simply means that, with a program with as many features as Norton Security, we’ve got you protected without slowing down your machines. Norton Security does what you need it to do, so you can focus on the important things in your family’s life that need to get done.

In addition to protecting you from the threats on the cyber landscape, we safeguard your data and help preserve your memories with the option to add 25GB of online storage. With Norton Security with Backup, if a device gets lost, stolen or simply breaks, your contacts, irreplaceable photos and documents will all be backed up safely to the cloud.

Welcome to the new Norton. You can freely enjoy peace of mind on all of your devices, no matter which family member is using them. We’ve bested ourselves by combining the greatest features of all of our products into one, easy to use platform. Norton Security is the Best of Norton in One, Simplified Product, so you and your family can Go Boldly, not blindly.

For more visit: norton.com/setupsetup nortoninstall norton

Source and Copyright: Norton blogs.

Is Norton Getting Out Of The Cloud Business?

Is Norton Getting Out Of The Cloud Business 1

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Is Norton Getting Out Of The Cloud Business?

Last week we announced the discontinuation of one of our cloud services called Norton Zone. I’ve been working on the Zone project for my entire four years at Symantec and when I told my friends that we made the decision to discontinue it, many had the same reaction: What? Norton is getting out of the cloud?

My answer? Absolutely not.

Zone is only one cloud service, among many, that Symantec offers under the Norton brand. Our decision to discontinue that one service in no way reflects a move away from the cloud. That would not be a smart move on our part. Cloud services are on the rise because more and more people are using mobile phones and tablets to communicate, access information, and share a lot of stuff. It’s the “cloud” that’s the backbone of all those apps.

So what’s in the Norton Cloud?

There are parts of our security services that are actually “in the cloud” or use the cloud to work on your behalf. A great example is Norton Online Backup. It backs up all your files to the cloud. That way, if a natural disaster occurs or your hard drive that you used to back up your files crashed, your files are safe with us. Norton online Backup is also part of Norton 360. And we use the cloud to safeguard your smartphone with Norton Mobile Security.

Symantec also has a service called Norton Family that lets you keep your kids safe when they are online.  Another service is Norton ID Safe that helps you manage your identities and provide additional security while you perform online transactions.

I could go on and on (and I’m not even mentioning the cloud services we offer to businesses and larger enterprises).

Suffice it to say that Symantec is not getting out of the cloud. We’ll continue to deliver services to you that use the cloud—securely—so you can boldly go wherever you want with whatever you’re carrying—smartphone, tablet, laptop—and know that you’re safe.

For more visit: norton.com/setupsetup nortoninstall norton

Source and Copyright: Norton blogs.

Top 10 “Riskiest” Websites

Top 10 “Riskiest” Websites

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Top 10 “Riskiest” Websites

We all know that the Internet can house all kinds of cyber scams and exploits, but did you know that certain kinds of websites are statistically more likely to host malware than others? You might think avoiding the obviously dodgy corners of the Internet is enough, but in fact approximately 67 percent of websites used to distribute malware are legitimate but compromised sites. You could be visiting them every day.

Software is constantly changing, and it takes time and resources to keep a website running on the latest, fully patched software. According to Symantec’s security expert, Kevin Haley, much of the time it’s a case of website owners “making it easy for the bad guys”.

“The ability of attackers to get on a legitimate website is related to the software that is running on that site,” he explains, “and vulnerabilities the software has that the attacker can take advantage of. This is directly correlated to the high number of websites that have unpatched vulnerabilities.”

Which Sites Are Vulnerable? 

Thankfully, we have information on what kinds of sites are most susceptible to compromise, thanks to data from users of Norton Web Safe, which monitors billions of traffic requests and millions of software downloads a day. The top ten most frequently exploited website categories might not be what you expect.

Top 10 “Riskiest” Sites For 2013: 

1.     Technology sites

2.     Business sites

3.     Hosting sites

4.     Blogging sites

5.     Illegal sites

6.     Shopping sites

7.     Entertainment sites

8.     Automotive sites

9.     Virtual Communities

10.  Educational sites

Top of the list for 2013 is the technology sector, which made up a massive 9.9 percent of all infected websites, closely followed by business websites with 6.7 percent. Interestingly, Symantec also found that hosting and blogging sites had more infections than illegal websites, which only managed fifth place. This is most likely due to the ease with which blogging sites can be set up by anyone using free platforms, where huge numbers of sites are still running old software versions. Completing the top ten we have shopping, entertainment and automotive sites, virtual communities and – rather worryingly – educational sites.

How Are These Sites Affected? 

The types of exploit vary by category as well, as you might expect. The compromised technology and business sites relied heavily on malware and fake antivirus attacks; hosting sites were all about scams; while blogging sites used browser exploits extensively. A popular method saw attackers share a link to a compromised blogging site on social networks.

The methods and types of websites change every year, and they follow the line of least resistance, says Haley. “It is completely related to software updating and patching. A new version of some software comes out, website admins update. The update patches known vulnerabilities, these websites are now less likely to be compromised.” And the attackers move on to the next target.

Stay Protected

Of course, avoiding entire categories of websites is a pretty impractical way of using the internet, and as Haley points out, it’s also “unfair to sites in any category that make the effort to stay malware free”. Instead, an awareness of the statistics can help you to be more careful on certain sites, and the best line of defense is always security software. Norton Internet Security knows the difference between safe and dangerous sites, and it prevents exposure to the latter automatically.

For more visit: norton.com/setupsetup nortoninstall norton

Source and Copyright: Norton blogs.

What’s The REAL Cost of ‘Free’?

What’s The REAL Cost of ‘Free’?
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What’s The REAL Cost of ‘Free’?

Consumers often shun software with even modest price tags in favor of the next tempting giveaway. But stop and think for a second and it’s pretty obvious these free downloads can’t really cost nothing, or the skilled people who make them wouldn’t be able to earn a living. No, free rarely means free, and you should always be wary of downloading more than you expected.

Advertising

The acceptable way to monetise free software is to use advertising, and whether you’re okay with that will largely depend on how much you want that new app without paying for it. As the saying goes, “if you’re not paying, you are the product,” and it rings true particularly in the mobile space.

A free app may show you adverts periodically while you use it, or it may request access to your data – location, contacts, even Facebook friends and Likes – in return for the service it provides. If you know and trust the company behind an app that might be a price worth paying, but is it really a fair trade when the app isn’t essential and you’ve never heard of the maker? You won’t think so when your details end up sold to marketing agencies around the world – or, worse, to identity thieves.

Other products

Another way free software is often monetised is by bundling it with other software. This occurs most often with free desktop applications, and the bundled applications are generally tucked away in the middle of the installation process. Even if you’re a novice, you should always choose a Custom installation over the Quick install, as you can click through each step and make sure nothing untoward is sneaked in.

At some point you may see a tick box (always checked by default) for a free extra, which is how you often end up with strange browser toolbars or search boxes after installing applications. Again, most of these extras won’t do any obvious harm, but they’re included in an attempt to change your habits and to find out more about you. If you can avoid them, it’s always best to do so.

Malware

Finally, the most sinister side to free software. You might think you’re only vulnerable to malware when you download something obviously dodgy, but while that definitely increases your chances of infection, it’s entirely possible for malware to be hidden inside legitimate software that’s been hacked – and from your position as the downloader you’ll have no way of knowing this when you visit a site.

Sticking to products and companies you know and trust is a good start, but it also makes sense to scan new downloads with antivirus software such as Norton Security before running the install process. If there is something hidden inside, security software will find it and eliminate the threat before any damage is done.

For more visit: norton.com/setupsetup nortoninstall norton

Source and Copyright: Norton blogs.

 

How Safe Is That App? Mobile Security Expert Tips To Help Protect Your Mobile Device.

Mobile Security Expert Tips To Help Protect Your Mobile Device.

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How Safe Is That App? Mobile Security Expert Tips To Help Protect Your Mobile Device.

Mobile apps have transformed the way we interact with our smartphones and tablets. If you’re looking for a quick way to access your bank accounts, a tool to make you more productive while on the move, or a game to help pass the time while you’re waiting for a bus, there’s an app for that.

In fact, with over 1 million apps on Google Play, for instance, there are often thousands of options to choose from in each app category. The fact that many can be downloaded in a matter of seconds means that you’re only ever moments away from installing a tool that could bring innovative new functionality to your mobile device.

However, the simplicity of the download process can also be your worst enemy. Have you ever stopped to consider what dangers may be lurking within that free app? Many apps have been developed by unscrupulous minds intent on a range of activities that could put you at risk – from stealing your identity to capturing your bank account details.

A little extra caution can go a long way to help you stay protected. As Con Mallon, Senior Director – Consumer Mobile Product Management at Symantec, points out below in his three top tips for app security and says that there are a number of telltale signs on Google Play designed to provide transparency about an app’s credentials.

Three top tips for app security

  • Take time to read the reviews of apps in the app store – the rating of the app can and will tell you something.
  • Look at when the app was published – how do you feel about using a brand new app or one that is used by few people? How does that fit with your tolerance for risk?
  • Don’t hit the ‘install’ button too quickly. For Android apps, you will be presented with a list of ‘permissions(link is external)’ that the app developer is requesting for the app. If a lot of permissions are being asked for, take a minute to think, do you think that the app really needs all of this?

Mallon also points out that additional tools are available to help you decide which apps you can trust.

“All of the above takes time and some knowledge and if you don’t feel comfortable in doing this, you may benefit from a little help,” said Mallon. “What you need is some advice on the privacy and performance implications when you are looking at apps in the app store and before you download them. Norton Spot(link is external) can do this for you if you are an Android user using Google Play.”

Available for Android devices, Norton Spot scans apps before you download them, watching out for signs that it may be insecure. For example, it can warn you that an app will leak your personal information, excessively use your battery or have annoying, intrusive behavior.

With this tool in place, you can decide which apps to trust before you install them.

For more visit: norton.com/setupsetup nortoninstall norton

Source and Copyright: Norton blogs.

Antivirus-Only Is Dead. Long Live Security!

Antivirus-Only Is Dead. Long Live Security!

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Antivirus-Only Is Dead. Long Live Security!

Are you doing enough to keep your information safe? With today’s sophisticated cyber threats you need more than just traditional antivirus (AV) software to stay protected. AV software can prevent, detect and remove malicious computer programs, and while more traditional viruses and email spam still exist, people now have more complex threats to worry about – and more important information to protect.

You need to guard your devices from not only viruses and worms, but web threats, spam and phishing. Cybercriminals can also use drive-by methods for stealing information and concealment malware that includes Trojans, backdoors and even fake antivirus software that can put your information at risk. Although antivirus products are meant to keep cybercriminals out of your devices, hackers can often work around these programs using social engineering, zero-day threats and other tactics.

Chances are you may need a security tune-up. At Symantec, we get a lot of questions from people about whether they’ve got the right software on their smartphones, tablets and PCs to keep viruses from infecting their devices. For a long time AV technology was the best defense against threats and our Norton solutions did a fantastic job of keeping viruses and worms out of your way. But the new landscape of threats requires proactive attack protection that includes antivirus AND intrusion prevention.

If you use our products, like Norton AntiVirus, Norton Internet Security, Norton 360, or Norton 360 Multi-Device, you already have a solution that provides more protection technologies than antivirus alone. These products include multiple layers of protection that help to protect you against existing threats, but also analyze suspicious files’ reputation, characteristics and behavior to determine if they are malware to stop known and unknown threats.

We’re always updating and tuning up our services to make sure you have the best security, but remember that a strong defense starts with you. Here are a few tips to make sure your information stays safe:

  • Beware of scams. Cybercriminals may use phishing emails to trick you into opening infected files and links. Delete messages from unknown or questionable sources and do not open or click links in the email and contact your account holder directly if you have a concern.
  • Stay secure. Don’t share personal information when browsing through public wi-fi networks. An unsecured connection can expose your browsing history, personal and financial details. When shopping online, use secure retailer websites and look for “HTTPS” in the web address.
  • Install security software. If you haven’t already, install security software on all your PCs, smartphones and tablets as your first line of defense against attacks. Reputable products, like Symantec’s Nortonproducts, will protect you against malware being unknowingly installed on your device and help you avoid malicious sites.

For more visit: norton.com/setupsetup nortoninstall norton

Source and Copyright: Norton blogs.

Will Amazon’s Fire Phone “Burn” Users?

Will Amazon’s Fire Phone “Burn” Users

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Will Amazon’s Fire Phone “Burn” Users?

Symantec security expert, Candid Wueest, investigates the security implications of Amazon’s new Fire Phone. For the original article, and to catch the latest security intelligence information.

Everyone has heard stories about smartphones with malfunctioning battery packs bursting into flames, but the new Amazon Fire Phone, despite its name, could pose a different kind of danger. Amazon’s recently announced device is due to be released in July and may present some potential security concerns for users.

Fire OS 

Amazon’s Fire Phone runs on Fire OS 3.5, which is based on Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean) and Amazon says they are working on upgrading to Android 4.4 (KitKat). Since the Fire OS is a fork of the Android OS, it is unclear how Amazon will react to major Android updates or patches in the future. Even with updates and patches, most users never consider upgrading the OS on their mobile device anyway, which can increase the attack surface of the device.

3D illusion 

The phone has a focus on multimedia and comes with integrated with various Amazon services. One interesting feature is dynamic perspective, which uses a parallax effect to create a 3D effect in certain applications. In order to achieve this, the phone’s motion sensors are used in combination with four special cameras on the front of the phone that track the user’s head movements to adapt the graphic to the current viewing angle. This may sound a bit creepy because it means that the phone is constantly taking pictures of your head, and with the infrared lights, this even works in the dark. However, it does not appear that the phone stores these pictures, so they should not be at risk of falling into the wrong hands.

Firefly technology 

The Fire Phone’s Firefly technology raises some privacy and security concerns. The Firefly service can recognize products, phone numbers, QR codes, URLs, and TV series after a user takes a picture of one of them. Once the object is identified, it is added to a list and can later be processed in several different ways. The most obvious way is the chance to buy the recognized product on Amazon, but technology can integrate with streaming services and social media as well. Fortunately, there is not an option to buy a product automatically after taking a picture, so users will not accidentally buy something after taking a random picture.

The Firefly service is available through a dedicated button on the lock screen, which also starts the camera. This is an excellent reason to not leave your phone unattended anywhere. Anyone could add useless items to your history list by taking pictures. Hopefully there are no errors in the processing algorithm. It would be a shame if a picture taken of an overly long URL crashes your phone or an innocently placed QR code in the background reconfigures your mobile.

The images taken for the Firefly service are pre-processed on the phone and then transmitted to the cloud for final processing with audio files and location information. Third-party developers can create their own plug-ins, which means they can also access the images and process them themselves. This presents some privacy concerns and as always users should be careful when deciding which services to trust. In any case, it’s probably better not to take pictures of top secret documents just to save a phone number.

No Google Play market 

Many people have noticed that the Amazon Fire Phone does not use the Google Play market. Instead, the phone supports Amazon’s own app store which has many apps, but is still missing a few user favorites such as YouTube and Google Maps for instance. Users who cannot live without their favorite app could choose to install applications from untrusted third-party locations. Applications from these sources may contain malware that can lead to a compromised device. Even if an app from a third-party location is clean, it might not work because Fire OS uses a different framework than Google’s Android OS. As with the Kindle Fire, this could lead to users rooting their Fire Phones to install the Google Play store. The increased security on Amazon’s devices means that there is no guarantee of rooting a Fire Phone.

Silk browser

The Fire Phone uses the Amazon Silk Web browser, a custom built browser based on Chromium, that takes advantage of the Amazon cloud to process some content and decrease website load times. Privacy concerns regarding this feature have been noted(link is external), but there is an option to disable the Web proxy.

The use of a custom browser does not inherently mean that it has more vulnerabilities than other browsers. It remains to be seen if attackers will focus on the Amazon Silk browser to find any vulnerabilities in the software. The market distribution of the Fire Phone could affect this. Widespread distribution of the phone could offer a profitable opportunity to attackers and entice them to put in the effort to find vulnerabilities.

There are still a few things that would be beneficial in the next Fire Phone update. Features like integrated VPN or single-sign-on are on the wish list for the next Fire OS update and could help with any security issues.

As with any mobile device we recommend that users be careful when installing apps from third-party markets and verify the privacy settings of their device.

For more visit: norton.com/setupsetup nortoninstall norton

Source and Copyright: Norton blogs.

When It Sounds Too Good To Be True, It Probably Is (A Scam)

When It Sounds Too Good To Be True, It Probably Is (A Scam)

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When It Sounds Too Good To Be True, It Probably Is (A Scam)

How safe was your family online in the last year? According to Symantec’s Internet Security Threat Report 2014, they weren’t as safe as you might think. The study analyses threat data from over 157 countries, more than 41.5 million attack sensors and a database of over 60,000 vulnerabilities, making it the most comprehensive picture of internet security in the world – and it says mobile users are falling for more “too good to be true” scams than ever.

Bad behavior 

An incredible 38% of mobile users have experienced cybercrime, and it’s often down to their own behaviour. More than half of users store sensitive files online, a quarter mix personal and work files in their cloud storage accounts, and – most startling – around one in five mobile users share their passwords with family and friends. But, even without these mistakes, there are some big trends to be aware of.

While some scams have declined in popularity, by far the leading type on social media in 2013 was the fake offer, which made up an amazing 81% of all scams. These offers all look too good to be true – because of course they are – yet a staggering number of people still fall for the lure of something for nothing. Fake offer scams come in multiple forms, all with different intended targets.

Too good to be true 

For teens, it can be the offer of free calls and texts. One bogus app claimed to deliver free minutes to social media users – but only if they entered their login details and forwarded the offer to ten friends. Other social media posts play on celebrity culture, posting links of the Facebook pages of actors and pop stars and using the accounts of those who click through to lure their friends with realistic-looking messages. It’s a blend of login phishing and old-fashioned spam, and it’s startlingly effective at rapidly propagating a scam around social networks and app stores.

Another continuing scam involves Facebook Likes. A post such as “Gain 100 followers by clicking this link and filling out a survey” might well direct the user to a legitimate page or a genuine app, but the action makes the scammer money through affiliate links or advertising. It goes without saying that either the free Likes never materialise, or if they do that they’re made up of bots, fake accounts or other compromised users.

For adults, the lure is often dating. Fake users will contact those looking for love, sending compliments and posting provocative photos, followed by a link that leads to a webcam site where credit card details are requested in order to get a few days “free” access – which quickly becomes very expensive access. Many people still fall for such scams, often choosing to ignore the obvious common tell that their new acquaintance is coming on quite strong.

Staying safe 

In the grand scheme of things social media and mobile scams might be small change, yet they greatly affect the individual users involved – and they’re so easily avoidable. If something seems too good to be true – be it an offer on Facebook, an amazing free app or a message from a supermodel – it almost certainly is too good to be true. Convincing yourself otherwise can be a costly mistake to make.

Want peace of mind to keep private information safe as you and your family learn, shop and share? Secure what’s most important with Norton 360 Family Premier.

For more visit: norton.com/setupsetup nortoninstall norton

Source and Copyright: Norton blogs.

Scammers’ Tricks You Don’t Want To Be Fooled By

Scammers’ Tricks You Don’t Want To Be Fooled By

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Scammers’ Tricks You Don’t Want To Be Fooled By

Unlike April Fools, which only happens once a year, scammers make a living off of fooling users 365 days a year. Here are a number of tricks that scammers use.

Phishing Scams: Whether it’s pretending to be your financial institution or a tweet from someone you know, asking, “Is this photo of you?”, phishing scams are after your login credentials to sites that are important to you. Recently, users of Google Drive and Google Docs were targeted in a sophisticated phishing scam. Phishing remains one of the most common scams used because they work, and as these scams become more innovative, they will continue to be one of the

Free Stuff: Who wouldn’t want a free iPhone or $100 gift card? Scammers know that free stuff is enticing to most people, which is why these types of scams never go out of season. As you might expect, nothing is truly free on social networks, so you should always be careful about sharing a photo, clicking on links, filling out surveys, or giving away any personal information.

Diet Craze: Every year, there’s a new diet craze making waves. Over the years, these diet pills and drinks have been pushed out in a torrent of email spam. However, as social networks have become more popular, scammers have begun using these services as vehicles to peddle the latest diet craze. Snapchat users recently saw this first hand. While the offer of free diet pills might seem appealing, it is often followed by unwanted charges in excess of $100.

Mobile Scareware: With more smartphones in circulation today, an old trick has found new life on mobile devices. The idea of “scareware” was to instill fear in the user,  convincing them to download additional software. Android users recently saw scareware adsclaiming that their device was infected with a threat known as “Tapsnake”. This scare tactic led to a set of instructions on how to download software claiming to be mobile antivirus. Only install applications from trusted app stores and use mobile security software from reputable vendors.

For more visit: norton.com/setupsetup nortoninstall norton

Source and Copyright: Norton blogs.

World Backup Day and Digital Spring Cleaning

World Backup Day and Digital Spring Cleaning

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World Backup Day and Digital Spring Cleaning

March 31 marks World Backup Day! What is backup? It’s a second copy of all your most important files like financial documents, family photos, videos and more. While it’s best to backup your files regularly now is as good a time as ever.  Here are a few more tips for digital spring cleaning! Read on.

Five easy ways to get started on digital spring cleaning:

  1. Be sure your software is up to date. Ignoring the latest software updates could put you at risk. Companies announce security vulnerabilities as they are discovered and quickly work to fix the vulnerabilities with software updates, also called “patches”.
  2. Clean up and Back up. Discard unneeded files to free up storage space on your laptop, tablets and smarphones – that could also include unused apps and programs. Also, backup your files! Save photos and important documents (like copies of old tax returns) to an online location or external hard drive. Found some old treasures on your desktop? Share those photos and videos with Norton Zone safe and easy online file sharing, get 5GB free!
  3. Check up on your social networking privacy settings. Keep as much of your profile private as you can, and think twice before posting absolutely every aspect of your life. Social engineering is where attackers use whatever information they can glean from your public profiles – date of birth, education, interests – to try to get into your accounts on all sorts of services. Just imagine how easily someone can find out these personal details and how many services use them as security questions.
  4. Update your passwords and make sure each one is unique and complex, using a hard-to-guess combination of upper and lowercase letters, numbers and special characters (?,!,@).
  5. Run a free PC Scan. PC running slow? Constantly seeing pop-ups? Use a free tool like Norton Power Eraser to detect and remove viruses that could be causing the problem. Norton Power Eraser eliminates deeply embedded and difficult to remove crimeware that traditional virus scanning doesn’t detect – so you can get your PC back.For more visit: norton.com/setupsetup nortoninstall norton

    Source and Copyright: Norton blogs.